READING COMPREHENSION TESTS

Learn how to improve results on reading comprehension tests in your classroom.

Link to reading comprehension worksheets and strategies.



Reading Comprehension Worksheets

Reading Comprehension Exam - The Three Most Common Mistakes


How do you improve your students results in reading comprehension tests?

Successful students commonly use one or more the following processes when working through a reading comprehension test. Give your students plenty of opportunity to practice using these reading strategies and their test results will improve.

1) GENERAL KNOWLEDGE

They use prior knowledge to navigate their way through a text.
What they already know is used as a framework upon which the new information can be laid.

For example, a student may gain understanding by reflecting that, "The Big Bad Wolf in the Three Little Pigs is probably bigger and scarier than my neigbour's dog".


2) CONTEXT CLUES

If they don't know the meaning of a word, they use words and phrases that give clues to the meaning.

3) REREADING

They read the text more than once to gain more meaning each time.


4) READING FOR DETAIL

They will slow down and reread certain sections of the text to fully understand important details.

When a reading comprehension test asks for a detailed answer (What is the main character's address?) the successful student goes back to the text and reads for that detail.


5) INFERENCING

They will come to conclusions about things by inferring.
However, the reader knows that each pig built a house and then began living in it.

It can be inferred from this that each pig also put furniture in the house.


6) PERSONAL IDENTIFICATION WITH THE TEXT
They identify with a character or circumstance and imagine what it would be like to be in the story.

This allows the student to engage their emotions and comprehend the elements of the story on a personal level.


7) PARAPHRASING

As they read along, they mentally retell the story to themselves in their own words.

Sometimes, this is just a mental conversation with themselves about the story (oh, that's awful! - I hate that! - What are they going to do now?).


8) VISUALIZING

As they read along, the student visualize the story. They create a running film of the text.


Give your students plenty of opportunities to practice using these strategies and you will see their reading comprehension test scores improve.


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