READING COMPREHENSION LESSON PLANS

Find exercises you can use for your reading comprehension lesson plans.

Link to more reading comprehension activities and worksheets.



Reading Comprehension Worksheets

Reading Comprehension Activities


Students get a better understanding of the text they are reading when they have the opportunity to manipulate its elements.

Linking text elements to personal experience, isolating key features and looking very closely at one feature of the text are all strategies that your students can use to improve their reading comprehension skills.

Try some of these activities in your next reading comprehension lesson plans.

1). There Is Someone At The Door!

Ask your students to do the following.

Imagine one of the characters from the text you are exploring has come over to dinner.

Write a recount of what happened.

You could include:
the time the character arrived
what the character was wearing
who in your family was home at the time
what your family's reaction was
what you served for dinner
what you talked about at dinner
what you did before dinner
what you did after dinner
what the best thing about the visit was
what the worst thing about the visit was

2). A List Of Ten Facts

Ask your students to do the following.

Write ten facts about the text your class is exploring.
Re-read it slowly and as you do this, write down the first ten facts you read.
Ignore any conversations and list what you know for certain exists in the scene and what the characters are doing.

Your students should end up with a list like this.

a) The Three Little Pigs moved out of their mother's house.
b) The First Little Pig built a house of straw.
c) The Second Little Pig built a house of sticks.
d) The Third Little Pig built a house of bricks.
e) The Big Bad Wolf knocked on the First Little Pig's house and asked to come in.
f) The First Little Pig refused to let the Big Bad Wolf in.
g) The Big Bad Wolf blew the First Little Pig's house down.
h) The First Little Pig ran away to the Second Little Pig's house.
i) The Big Bad Wolf knocked on the Second Little Pig's house and asked to come in.
j) The Second Little Pig refused to let the Big Bad Wolf come in.

Some students will focus on minute details and others will focus on broader features. There is no right way. As long as the students are breaking the story into parts they are becoming more familiar with it.

3). Let's Take A Closer Look

Ask your students to do the following.

Take one thing that exists in the text your class is exploring and write a one page report on it.
For example, if you were reading "The Three Little Pigs", you could do a report on pigs, builders, house construction, straw, bricks, or wolves.

These reports make a great classroom display.

4). What will happen now?

Ask your students to consider what will happen to the characters of the story, after the story.

For example: The Wolf hides in the forest until his burns have healed. He never leaves, choosing to spend the rest of his days living in a cave at the side of a craggy mountain. For food, he hunts wild mice and rabbits.

The First and Second little Pig live with the Third Little Pig until they finish building their own brick houses. They choose to build their new houses right next to their brother's brick house. All three pigs install metal bars at the top of their chimneys so that it is impossible for anyone to climb down them.




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