ABSTRACT NOUN LIST 100


Here is an abstract noun list of 100 words that you can download in PDF form.





THIS IS WHAT IS ON THE ABSTRACT NOUN LIST.



100 Abstract Nouns

An abstract noun is an idea, a quality or a state.

An abstract noun can’t be seen, heard, smelt, tasted or felt.




ability

advantage

anger

annoyance 

appetite

argument

awareness

beauty 

belief 

bravery

brilliance

calm

care

childhood

clarity

cleverness

company 

confusion

delay

dishonesty

disregard

divorce

dream

education

envy

fact 

fad

failure

fame

fashion

fear

feat

fiction

friendship

freedom

gain

generation

generosity

goal

goodness

growth

happiness

hatred

honesty

idea

infancy

irritation

joy

justice

kindness

lie

limit

loneliness

loss

love

luck

luxury

marriage

movement

mystery

nap

peace

philosophy

plan

pleasure

poverty

practice

religion

rhythm

riches

right

slavery

success

standard

stupidity

sleep

solitude

sorrow

talent

team

term 

thought

threat

thrill

time

timing

tiredness

trend

trick

trip

trouble

truth

union

weakness

wealth

wisdom

wish

wit

wonder

worry

   


HERE ARE SIX WAYS YOU CAN USE THE ABSTRACT NOUN LIST.




  • Print in A3 and post in the classroom writing area                           
  • Print in A4 and give to your students to glue into their english book                                                                                                   
  • Print in A3 and post on the notice board - challenge your students to add to the list.  Can they think of 100 more?                                              
  • Cut the list into slips of paper with a single word on it.  Put the word in a container.  Let each student pull out one or two words and then use them in a sentence.                                                                   
  • Write the words on the board in a jumbled way                                          
  • (divorce = edvoirc) and ask your students to work out what they are. If it is hard for them to work out the answers you can write them on the bottom of the board. This works well if you do 5 or more words at a time.                                                                          
  • Write 10 or more of these words on the board and ask your students to draw a picture of the idea. If there is time they can show the class and explain the word to them.  These pictures and the words that go with them could be put together to make a classroom display.  The classroom writing/literacy area is a great place for this display.